Social Media Breakdown #5

Let’s hear it for Social Media Breakdown #5!

Check out the previous posts I did on Google, Microsoft, and General Mills:

Like the previous post with GeneralMills, we are straying away from tech for the time being and staying in the consumer goods and food lane. And today, we will be focusing on a post from the globally famous and loved McDonald’s.

Social Post Rating:

Creativeness/Uniqueness:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Relevancy:

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Clear Objective/CTA:

Rating: 2 out of 5.

“pika pika!”

A post that apparently only needs two words to get the point across–McDonald’s creatively used the catch-phrase of every 90’s kid’s favorite yellow mouse Pokemon, Pikachu, to announce their new kid’s meal. The image of new Pikachu-themed kid’s meal is also followed with: “It’s back.”

Well, when you are a prolific and well-known company like McDonald’s, you don’t need to say much to get the world in a frenzy over this cute new box. The copywriting (if we will call that) is assuming that people will know about Pikachu and Pokemon, and even if you don’t know either, the cute image of the kid’s meal is visually appealing enough. There are no hashtags and no links to drive people too. With big brand consumers like McDonald’s, the marketing team is urging people to drive (or order online) to their nearest McDonald’s to buy this product.

McDonald’s relies on brand recognition, and of course, it is well earned and prolific, but it would have been interesting to see if McDonald’s linked to a landing page with more information about their kid’s meal boxes. There could have been a blog on the past boxes and maybe even a newsletter people could sign up to receive news and product updates on McDonald’realted activities. But then again, does McDonald’s really need to take things a step further? No, but just for this purpose, I wish they did 😦

Anyway, here comes Jane taking the stage as we consider different viewer’s journeys: 

  1. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the McDonald’s post. She looks at the post but does not engage.
  2. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the McDonald’s. Finding the post interesting, Jane “likes” the post but does not engage further.
  3. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the General Mills post. Finding the post interesting, Jane decides she will visit McDonald’s for lunch and order the Pikachu meal.
  4. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the General Mills post. Finding the post interesting, Jane decides she will visit McDonald’s for lunch and order the Pikachu meal. Enjoying the meal, Jane shares a pic of her eating on her social media.

Now, what does each interaction mean? You can learn more about KPIs & Metrics, and their definitions in my previous posts:

  1. Jane looks at the post but does not engage, so her view will be considered an “impression”.
  2. Jane looks and “likes” the post, so her view and “like” will be captured as an impression and engagement. 
  3. Jane looks, likes, and visits her closest Mcdonald’s to purchase the Pikachu meal. Great job, Jane #3!
  4. Now, this Jane #4 is a different typeof great! Jane goes above and beyond by liking the post, engaging with it, buying the product, and then going on social media, promoting the Pikachu box on her social media. Jane can have 0-1 million followers but it is still another way McDonald’s can possibly get another sale. Let’s say Jane has 1,000 followers on Instagram and at least 3 people buy the McDonald’s product because they saw Jane’s post and was interested in trying it as well. That is 3 more customers McDonald’s serves without even any advertisement from their marketing department.

Thank you, Jane, for being interested in Pikachu, fast food, and interacting with McDonald’s posts.

What are other posts you want me to break down?

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