Social Media – Breakdown #1

I just had a great idea 💡 (As you can probably tell, my perspective on great is twisted but just bare with me…). 

I started writing about social media marketing to spread the word on some helpful tips, but instead of just telling you, I can break down the process and really show you what goes behind a post. 

A while ago, I talked about the importance of ToV (Tone of Voice), so I will show you a post from Google, and we will break it down: 

Creativeness/Uniqueness:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Readability:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Clear Objective/CTA:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

This copywriting is playful with the play-on-words with “Sundae” in place of Sunday, and an emoji is used. But the post’s objective is clear – to get viewers to leave Twitter and check out ice cream trends on Google’s website.

When you click the link, you can see why Google is drawing people to the other side–there is UTM tracking. This allows companies to track viewers’ actions when driving them to sites.

Here is the link:

Let’s break it down –

The source is from Twitter, so Google used “tw&utm” to identify to their digital marketing team that viewers of this website started from the Twitter post. 

Medium =social is to differentiate to the DM team that it was a social output that drove the result to the website.

Campaign – It would be no surprise to say that Google is running several paid and organic campaigns, so the “og&utm” is to differentiate between the others. If I were to guess, I would say “og” means organic since this post is for a topical day and is not driving people to a Google product or service. BUT – on the top right, there is a button for users to “Subscribe,” where users can receive the latest news from Google in their inbox. So the post has the post to indirectly lead to a product sale along the road. It may take longer for a sale to go through or for it to qualify as a MQL (Marketing Qualified Lead), but it can all be possible through this organic post about National Ice Cream Day 🍦 lol 

Isn’t it funny how a post that technically has nothing to do with business can lead to a Lead or a Sale? That’s the beauty of digital marketing.

So let’s consider different viewer’s journeys: 

  1. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the Google post. She looks at the post but does not engage.
  2. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the Google post. Finding the post funny, Jane “likes” the post but does not engage further.
  3. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the Google post. Finding the post funny, Jane “likes” the post and clicks the link, interested to know more. Scrolling through the content, Jane eventually closes out of the site.
  4. Jane, a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey, opens Twitter and sees the Google post. Finding the post funny, Jane “likes” the post and clicks the link, interested to know more. Scrolling through the content, Jane finds herself enjoying her time and wants to “Subscribe” to receive similar content from Google.

Now, what does each interaction mean? You can learn more about KPIs & Metrics, and their definitions in my previous posts:

  1. Jane looks at the post but does not engage, so her view will be considered an “impression”.
  2. Jane looks and “likes” the post, so her view and “like” will be captured as an impression and engagement. 
  3. Jane looks, likes, and visits the website. Jane scrolls through the page but does no other actions. In this scenario, Jane’s actions will be captured and can be reviewed in Google Analytics. Here the DM team will see that a viewer was brought in from the organic post, and they will also see the average engagement time of all of their viewers. Though Jane is only one person, through the data that is collected, the DM can team can learn from this experience and strategize how to target users better. They can consider many things – “If viewers are being taken to our site, they are not lingering? Is it because the website is taking too long to load? Should we reconsider the user journey? Is it easy to navigate? Is the content engaging enough?” So despite Jane not subscribing, Google’s DM team can still use the captured data to restructure their strategy to get more Jane #4’s.
  4. Oh, why can’t there be more Jane #4’s in the world? Jane does exactly what Google wanted – she viewed the post, liked it (which allows other people that Jane follows to see that she engaged with; go JANE), clicked the link to the website, viewed and engaged with the content, AND subscribed, which will let Jane receive emails and product updates. Google’s DM team will be able to review all of Jane’s captured data and try to understand better why she subscribed and get others to follow suit. And because Jane is a 25-year-old woman from New Jersey who frequently engages with Twitter, we can start targeting her knowing her behavior. From this interaction, we know that Jane likes a post that has a playful ToV but are still informative enough to have a clear CTA. Jane also is curious; she wants to know more about Google trends and information pertaining to posts. Jane is more likely to click a post to investigate rather than be content with a simple post with a few sentences. So Jane is patient and curious–she will be a great target to send her information with lengthy copywriting and backlinks to other pages, and maybe, just maybe, she will be a potential lead.

Thank you, Jane, for this long-winded breakdown example.

I’ve gotten sidetracked but I wanted to show the power of a post from the top to the bottom of the marketing funnel. And how much thought goes behind a simple tweet.

What are other posts you want me to break down?

5 thoughts on “Social Media – Breakdown #1

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